Installing new acrylic fixed ports

I finally tackled the leaking fixed ports this weekend. Removing the old leaking windows took much more effort than I had anticipated, but other than that, the entire project went well, and I managed not to stain the deck with too much black Dow Corning sealant.

Step 1: Remove old fixed ports.

fixedports01

The screws came out easy, but the sealant did not want to let go. As you can see, I didn’t manage to get either window off in one piece. Note that the factory method for mounting these windows required painting the edges and the center black, so that you couldn’t see the sealant through the window. However, that means you’re now bonding to the paint instead of the acrylic, so we decided not to do the painting. We also decided not to use screws.

fixedports02

The center sections were completely coated in sealant. While this made the old windows ridiculously hard to get off, it did nothing to actually keep them from leaking.

Step 2: Scrape and clean the mounting surface.

fixedports03

Step 3: Apply 3M mounting tape

fixedports04

Step 4: Level the new plexiglass window and pop it on the mounting tape.

fixedports05

Step 5: Mask around the freshly mounted fixed port.

fixedports06

Step 6: Goop it up with Dow Corning 795.

fixedports07

Step 7: Smooth the sealant into all the cracks, wipe up the excess, and then pull the tape and peel the paper off the plexiglass.

fixedports08

Step 8: Admire your new fixed ports that no longer leak when it rains.

fixedports09

6 thoughts on “Installing new acrylic fixed ports

  1. your original windows looks like they were screwed to the fiberglass. with the new windows, did you only use the 3m tape or did you screw the new windows like the old. hard to tell from the photos. also how much does your cabin bend… I’ve got a couple leaky framed windows on my moody 376 and i was thinking about ditching the aluminum frames and using your method… the new windows look sharp btw

    • We only used 3m tape and the Dow Corning. There is a noticeable curve to the cabin, but it’s hot enough in Houston that the acrylic flexed to shape without issue. I did a Starwind 27 with this method 9 years ago and those windows are still sealed, so I can say the method does hold up.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s