What do we even want?

We have been boat shopping since about 6 months after we bought our last boat.  We’ve gone through a lot of different phases while trying to decide what our “forever boat” would look like.  We knew we wanted more space, we wanted a boat that would hold its value, and appreciate as we added more gear, and we wanted something a little more friendly to open seas than our current boat. 

For about 3 years I was convinced that this boat was going to be a catamaran.  It had more space, they’re in high demand and therefore hold their value, and they are relatively flat when sailing.  Once we started to do some serious shopping we realized that in our price range of 50k-80k the actual square footage we were going to get would be a downsize over our regular boat.  I wasn’t swayed though and we went aboard many the odd shaped catamaran.  In the summer of 2013 we chartered a 40 ft Lagoon in the SVIs.  Being aboard that boat for a week changed my mind completely.  While it was very spacious and comfortable at anchor, while sailing the see saw motion of the boat was jarring and uncomfortable.  So I decided that for the price difference, it was not worth the cost. 

So we focused in on monohulls.  We started to hone in on what we wanted.  1. Two cabins 2. Separate shower stall 3. boat that would hold value 4. A heavy duty boat with lots of displacement. 5. Aft Cockpit.  We wanted to stay somewhere below 42 ft to keep the boat pretty manageable between the two of us, and keep maintenance costs down.  

Tayana 42

As we started to look we found that there are a lot of blue water boats in the 42ft length that have everything we want, but in the 80-120k price range.  As we dug deeper we started to find a few boats under 40ft that had two cabins that might be an option.  The IP38 has an aft cabin that is big enough for two people.  They are normally a little higher in price but every once in awhile one will come down.  The Krogen 38 has two lovely cabins and a separate shower stall.  The Amel Sharki has two cabins and even though its a center cockpit, it convinced me with its overall beautiful appearance.  

Amel Sharki

We started to ask around about some of these models in owners groups on facebook, and that eventually led to us meeting some owners in real life and being able to do walk throughs and even go sailing on some of the of the same model boats.  This really helped us to understand potential issues with certain models and gave us a good idea of what to look for when shopping.  

This early research stage is really essential to the whole boat buying process.  Once you see a boat in person its easy to develop an emotional attachment and be blinded to potential costly issues. 

We’re really excited to say that we closed today on a 38ft Kadey Krogen.  It was not an easy road though.  So much to tell you all about the buying/offer process very soon. 

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Putting Gimme Shelter up for sale

It didn’t really hit me until I locked her up for the last time and walked back to my car.  Sitting in my car crying all I could think about was all of the great memories we made in this boat since 2013 when I bought her.  I had bought her myself in an effort to move both my relationship with Fred and our sailing life in a forward direction.

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Our first boat, a 27ft Starwind, was an amazing boat and we stayed on her every weekend for years.  But Gimme, a 34ft Oday offered us a fridge, and a double sink, and so many more comfort items that made our weekends so much easier.

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Over the years we have had a steady stream of projects.  Installing central AC, upgrading all the canvas, upgrading the engine, replacing the fridge compressor, redoing windows and hand rails so that she has no leaks, etc.  All the time we talked about what our next boat might look like but not really getting any closer to making the move.

For the last year or so there have not really been any projects.  The boat is pretty solid and relatively low maintenance by design.  We’ve reached a point where we couldn’t really do any upgrades either, as it makes no sense to put $20,000 worth of equipment on a $20,000 dollar boat.

Fred picked up a 67 Cougar car project, but now even that is nearing is completion and the time had really come.  It was time to get a new bigger project boat.

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The first step to that is clean our boat out completely and to get her on the market.  I went to Lowes and got us some giant plastic tubs and we started taking everything that wasn’t specific to our boat out of it.  I then untuffted all of the cushions and took them home to wash and retuft.  It took about four days of two people working with magic erasers to get every bit of the inside and outside spotless.

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Sunday night I was sweaty and dirty from a day of hard scrubbing.  I backed my way out of the boat cleaning all of the floors one last time.  As I locked the door and walked back to the car it felt like we were losing a member of the family.  I gave Fred a call and we reminded each other that no change is ever easy, and that this is the first step to our next great adventure.