7 days chartering in Greece: Day 2 – Poros

The first morning waking up on the boat set the tone for the rest of the vacation. Four of us woke early to have coffee and breakfast and prep the boat for an early departure, and three of us slept. We put the sails up for awhile, but there was little to no wind. We passed by Aegina and some large rocks to enter into the harbor near Poros. We saw our first and only flying fish

We took some time to anchor in a cove by ourselves, don our wet suits and do a bit of swimming. We saw a few fish but not a lot. Lots of old moorings and nets. Sea urchins were everywhere on the shores.

Pulling into Poros it was impossible not to be overwhelmed by how beautiful the city was. It was as if the city rose up out of the sea on the mountain and we were moored at the base of it.

We had our first attempt at med mooring. After picking up a tire on the first try we got ourselves settled in. We did a short hike up to the clock tower and explored some old churches.

We began to see why Greece is known for its cats.

Me and Fred took off to get some good night time shots, while everyone else settled in at the one cafe with wifi.

7 days chartering in Greece: Day 1 – Planning and Paperwork

A “last minute” birthday invite from a friend led us on an adventure chartering a 42ft Fountaine Pajot Cat in Greece this fall. Last minute for me is only have three months to plan provisions, anchorages, and our sail plans.

We stressed over the plans for the entire three months, but in the end picked a fairly well-traveled path around the Saronic Gulf just west of Athens.

I used the same method as my last trip to plan the provisions. You can read those details here. The only difference this time was that everything was in KG and G and so it took a bit more math on my part. We sent the list off to a provisioning company this time instead of doing the shopping ourselves, and had the supplies delivered to the boat.

We got in early to the marina Saturday, but the food arrived late. The charter manager sat us down to sign paperwork and pay all of the remaining money owed. He explained to us that there would be a $3600 deposit paid, and if there was any damage at all to the boat that we would be out the cost of repairs or all of that money if the repair was higher than their insurance deductible. We could however pay $300 up front to have the insurance put into our name, and we would then be covered for damages. After much debate we decided to go ahead and pay for the insurance money. It was worth it to not have to worry throughout the week.

The marina was a busy place. The docks were just big enough for cars to drive down, and they did. They drove full speed, forwards and in reverse.

After loading the provisions and signing paperwork it was too late to head out. We opened up a few cans of Mythos and headed over to a local place that our captain recommended. He helped us to order a hearty Greek style group meal that ended up being enough food for three days.

We all went to bed excited to start our adventure on the open ocean in the morning.

Our visit to Doug Jackson and SV Seeker in Tulsa, Oklahoma

The boat the Internet built — that’s the slogan emblazoned atop the website we’ve visited the past few months watching Doug Jackson’s progress as he continues to build SV Seeker, a 74-foot steel origami hull, junk rigged, cargo, motorsailer in his front yard.

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Doug has come to the conclusion that the best way to realize his dream is to share it with everyone around the world. Readers from across the globe comment with their ideas and expertise, and Doug is willing to house and feed anyone who wants to make the trek to Tulsa, Oklahoma to work on Seeker.

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As we made our way back to Houston on a cold, rainy Sunday after spending a week visiting family, we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to take a small detour to meet Doug and actually see SV Seeker for ourselves.

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When we arrived we met Dave Fickle from Arizona who had spent the week of Thanksgiving helping Doug with wiring the ROV and welding the propeller shroud. He began welding cable guides onto the rudder quadrant while Doug took a break to give Mary and myself the grand tour.

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After a very busy summer the pilot house and hull are mostly constructed and some of the hatches are in place.

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The cabin is also beginning to take shape as Doug continues to leak-test his keels and tanks.

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The pile of portals is growing. If you look back at the hull photos, you can see that Doug has drawn in their future locations.

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The water-tight doors to be installed in Seeker’s cabin are also a sight to behold.

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We even got to check out Doug’s dinghy design, complete with seasonal elf captain.

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The tour was great, but no trip to visit SV Seeker would be complete without doing some work. Mary took an interest in the welding.

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Doug was kind enough to explain to her how the welder worked and gave her a quick lesson.

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And suddenly, Mary, who had never welded before, was attaching a cable guide to the rudder quadrant.

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And it turns out, her welding isn’t too bad!

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Doug said he estimates at least two more years of work before Seeker is ready to hit the water, and you’re probably wondering, how will Seeker get to the water.

Tulsa is actually an inland port city, and just 15 miles away from where Seeker sits is a shipyard on the Arkansas River where she’ll eventually be launched. Then it’s just a matter of making her way through the Oklahoma lock and dam system until eventually she’ll hit the Mississippi River and then the Gulf of Mexico.

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We could have stayed all day, but with dogs sitting in the car and another eight hours of driving to do, we had to say goodbye and get back on the road.

Special thanks to Doug for his incredible hospitality. We hope to see you again on the water.

Make sure to visit Doug’s site at www.svseeker.com. There’s also an SV Seeker Facebook Group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/svseeker/?fref=ts

 

Provisioning for a 7 day charter

Ok, so my method of provisioning has three steps.

1. Create a menu and get it approved by everyone onboard

2. Create a spreadsheet with every ingredient and everything you will need to make each dish, and then sort by ingredient

3. Add up how much you will need of each item, and make a shopping list

Step One.  On my menu I included our activities for that day so that everyone could see and relate it to the meals.  For instance if we were going to be sailing all day I would include a cold lunch like Turkey sandwiches.  Here is an example:

Tuesday – Make our way around the southern end of Vieques and pick-up a
mooring at Esperanza.  For those wanting to do Biobay, this is the night
as it is the new moon.  We should be able to get dinner on shore this
night.

B- Bagel halves with butter and jam, Hard boiled eggs, Bananas

L- Turkey Sandwhiches, Pasta Salad

D- Restaurant

I also added a group snack for each day as I assumed with all the physical activity we would be needing it.  We also hae 4 teenagers aboard who require extra food. At the end I also included a very open list of possible drinks.  Without knowing exactly what everyone likes to drink though, its a hard thing to add.  I will be leaving that largely up to them at the store, with only the beer counted out at 5 beers per person per day.

Step two.  After everyone had made their changes to the menu I went through and put them on my spreadsheet.  My sheet has three columns, Dish, ingredient, and quantity.  I went through and looked up recipes for all of the meals.  On Allrecipes.com you can change the quantity of servings to avoid a lot of in your head math.  I did 2 servings per person, and for lighter dishes I did 2.5 servings. If seeing helps here it is  Provisioning List  After that I just sort by ingredient and add up all of the amounts.  I wouldn’t stress to much on what unit you’re using ie pound vs package vs can.  You are the one adding it up anyway.

Step three.  I just type it all up into an easy to read list for whomever will be doing the buying.  Here is mine Shopping List

As  side note I think it would be helpful to use your original spreadsheet (before sorting) and your menu to portion off foods on the boat for each day.  That way for example if you have rationed pasta salad for two meals, it won’t all get served at the first meal.  I would expect that whatever is served will be gone.  Also for each meal you could mark what extra food you had left over.  That way you know the difference between your leftovers and your provisions for future meals.  So if people are hungry you can offer them food without ruining your meal plan.

Her perspective: Packing for a 7 day charter

So in about 10 days we are leaving for the SVIs, and I am in full on planning mode.  I am the type of person who likes to have everything planned out in advance.  Thank goodness that our crew seems to be the same way.  Today at home I started to lay everything out and decide what I really needed for seven days.  Trick is that I need to fit it all into one bag.  For my bag I chose a waterproof soft duffel bag.  As a side note, I like this bag a lot, but would never get another one with a roll up top like this.  Every time you remember something and need to put it in the bag, you have to unroll and re roll it.  It’s a pain for a weekend bag.

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So here is the list:

  • Sneakers for walking/hiking
  • flip flops for on the boat
  • water shoes for Sea Urchins and other pokey things
  • 5 bathing suits
  • Light sweater for evenings
  • PJ pants for when its cold, or for being comfy
  • 4 Shorts
  • 4 Light tanktops
  • Sunglasses
  • Foul weather gear (at least the jacket)
  • 4 beach coverups
  • Outfit nice enough for a beach restaurant
  • Supercool hat
  • My make up (yeah, I’m not ready to give it up), and a comb

Also not pictured below, Razor, underwear, and ibuprofen

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Oops I think I forgot something!

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If You guys have any packing suggestions I’d love to hear them.

Planning the Spanish Virgin Islands

In June we’ll be making our first big trip of the year, flying from Houston to Puerto Rico, then spending a week on a Lagoon Catamaran exploring the Spanish Virgin Islands.

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We were invited on the trip by friends we made crewing in the Icicle Series Regatta — yet another reason why it pays to spend some time crewing on different boats and meeting new people in the sailing community.

While it’s too early to know what the weather will be doing in June, we have started mapping out our planned destinations and creating an ambitious but tentative itinerary. I wasn’t familiar with the SVIs, so I spent today mapping it out to better understand the trip.

Now to do some research on all of the things to see and do in these locations!