10 Thoughtful Christmas Gift Ideas for Boaters 2016

Hey guys, its that time of year again!   We’ve found a few products this year that we’ve really enjoyed, and we’d like to share them with you.  Great post to link on your facebook for a little hint hint to your friends.  ūüôā

  1. A Cold Can – Ok so full disclamer, we may or may not be friends with the man who invented this thing but it is pretty sweet.  It keeps your drink really cold, seals completely with a locking cap, and floats!  Plus you will be supporting a small business. http://www.thecoldcan.com/

2. This spotlight from West Marine – A lot of people don’t think about needing a spotlight until they get caught out at night.  Think of it for them!  This one is rechargable and happens to go on sale at 50% off on black friday.  Making it only $50

3. Personalized Flag – There’s nothing like hoisting a custom flag with your name on it to make people say “wow these people are serious about pirating”.  We got one a few years ago and its one of our most cherished possessions.

4.A French Press and/or Airtight Coffee Container – This is the combo we’ve had on the boat for a couple years now and we really really love them.  Both are absolutely good as new after living exclusively on the boat.

5. Nesting Pots – If you really really love the person you’re buying for you’ll get them this Magma cooking set.  I swear it is better quality than the ones I have at my house.

6. I’d be remiss if I didn’t include my bags in this list!  Please feel free to visit my shop and buy a recycled sailbag for someone you love.  Use coupon code Christmas2016 for 15% off through Jan 1st.

7. Black and Decker Air System – There are a lot of floating toys on a boat, and most of them can’t be inflated simply using your lungs.  This little air station has attachments for everything you might need and its battery operated.  We have one and we’ve found we can blow up about 4 air mattresses per charge.

8. Mono Guitar Case -These guitar cases are extra tough for boat life.  They have impact panels for when you’re getting knocked around underway.  They’re also waterproof for dingy rides to shore.

9. Luci lights – As a boater you can never have too many luci lights.  They’re small, light weight, and last longer than any other solar light I’ve ever tried.  We’ve had ours for a few years now and they’re still going strong.  They come in all sorts of colors and styles these days.

10. If all else fails get them what they really need.  A West Marine gift card.

If none of these ideas catch your eye check out our list from last year.

 

The cheapest way to add Wi-Fi to any camera (or your boat)

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When you’re boating or backpacking, it’s not so easy to just pull out your camera’s memory card and dump the photos onto a computer. Half the time I have the camera sealed in a dive case or wrapped up in plastic to protect it from the elements, and most of the time I don’t even have a computer with me.

When we were in the Spanish Virgin Islands I really appreciated¬†the fact that my Sony had built-in Wi-Fi. I could climb back on the boat, towel off, then turn on the Wi-Fi¬†to send all my snorkeling photos to my iPad for review without ever having to take the camera out of the dive case. I could then Instagram a good one and hop right back in the water to dive some more. I didn’t have to worry about unsealing and resealing the dive case, defogging the lens again, or any of that rigmarole.

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Unfortunately, not all cameras come with Wi-Fi. However, Wi-Fi SD cards have been around for a few years now and are getting better all the time. You might have heard of Eye-Fi. They were the pioneers of Wi-Fi¬†SD cards, but an Eyefi Mobi Pro card still runs about $99. There’s also the Transcend Wi-Fi option.

I was almost ready to spend the money on an Eye-Fi when I came across the Toshiba Flashair. Apparently, the FlashAir has never been too popular, and the iPhone and Android apps were downright terrible when it first came out. However, a 32GB FlashAir SD card is now only $30 (I ordered mine on eBay). At that price, I decided to give it a try.

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Setup of the card was easy. You just pop it in the camera and download the free FlashAir app to your phone. Each time you launch it after the card has been formatted, it gives you the option to change the Wi-Fi¬†name and password. This is a nice feature if you were shooting a professional event where lots of people might be using Wi-Fi, however, it has one major flaw. Every time you format the SD card in the camera, it resets the SSID and Password to the factory default. I might format the card three times a day when I’m working, so I gave up on setting a custom¬†Wi-Fi name.

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Once the app is launched, your phone or tablet will automatically connect to the Wi-Fi generated by the SD card and allow you to browse the photos on the card. (I found Android devices are much faster at connecting than iOS devices, which sometimes need help finding the network.)

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Just select the photos you want to download to your phone, and it beams them right over. But here’s the cool part, the FlashAir app doesn’t just work for photos. It also does music and movie files, so you can use it in other devices like a Zoom recorder or a video camera.

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Perhaps¬†you do have a computer, but you don’t have an SD card reader available, or maybe you just hate installing apps on your phone. If you connect the computer or a phone to the FlashAir Wi-Fi¬†and then open the web browser, it reads the card in the web browser and lets you browse and download the photos that way as well.

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But wait, that’s not all! If you stick the FlashAir in an SD card reader, it still generates Wi-Fi. That means, if you need Wi-Fi¬†on your boat, you could grab one of these FlashAir cards and a card reader, stick it in an SD slot on your chartplotter or even a 12 volt DC plug and suddenly have a portable Wi-Fi network for all the devices on your boat.

Now¬†don’t get too excited. It won’t give you Internet, just a Wi-Fi¬†network that allows all of your devices to connect to each other. For instance, if you have an AIS system that needs Wi-Fi¬†to send info to your chartplotter, this $30 SD card will allow that. It can connect up to six devices. (However, if you do have an Internet connection, it also allows Internet pass through.)

So what’s the downside to a Wi-Fi¬†SD card you ask? Well, although the transmitter¬†has a very low power draw, it still drains the battery faster. Cameras with built-in Wi-Fi¬†like the Sony are able to turn it on and off to conserve battery, but with the FlashAir, from what I can tell the Wi-Fi is¬†on all the time. However, in use I can’t say I’ve seen a noticeable change in battery life.

Yes,¬†the FlashAir app does transfer¬†RAW files. I shoot everything in RAW, but I honestly don’t know why anyone would want to transfer a 45 MB file over Wi-Fi. I shoot RAW + 1.2 MB JPG Small. The RAW is for my photo archives and for making prints. I download those files¬†when I get home. The JPG small file saves space on the SD card and my phone or tablet but has plenty of resolution for social media. Here’s a¬†few¬†examples straight out of the camera via the FlashAir card.

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So there you have it, the Toshiba Flashair 3 Wi-Fi SD card, the $30 solution to adding Wi-Fi to any camera.