Guitar Comparison: Gibson Hummingbird versus Epiphone Hummingbird Artist

The Gibson Hummingbird has always been my dream guitar. It had that rock and roll pedigree, mellow mahogany tone, and just enough flamboyance to make it a legendary instrument. There’s just one catch, it’s really expensive.

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I fell in love with the Gibson back in my teens, and more than 20 years later, I finally have one (used, of course, I’m not crazy). However, needing another guitar for boating and camping, I was very curious as to the real differences between the Gibson and the very affordable Epiphone Hummingbird Artists. In fact, I found a blueburst B-stock Epiphone Hummingbird Artist for only $169.

Aside from the headstock you’d think the Epiphone would be a spitting image of the Gibson, but it’s definitely not. First off, their bodies, while both mahogany, are not quite the same size. The Gibson is slightly wider and deeper than the Epiphone with a more pronounced curve to the back.

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Both guitars have a 24.75″ scale neck, which is probably my favorite aspect of the guitar. It really helps me reach some of those chords with wide spreads. While the Gibson neck does feel more refined, when switching back and forth between the two guitars, you essentially feel like you’re playing the same instrument.

The Epiphone has a synthetic bone nut and a truss rod cover with three screws while the Gibson has a real bone nut and a truss rod cover with only two screws.

The rosewood bridges are similar, but once again, the Epiphone has a synthetic saddle while the Gibson has a real bone saddle. However, the Gibson still has cheap plastic pegs to hold in the strings. Being outside of the saddle, I know they don’t affect tone, but for the price, you’d think Gibson would spend $1 for real bone there as well.

There’s a HUGE difference in the tuners. My Hummingbird has sealed grover tuners, and the newer Gibson models have sealed Gotoh tuners. Epiphone doesn’t even mention the brand of their cheapo tuners in any of their collateral. They’re pretty terrible. I had some serious trouble keeping the Epiphone in tune for the first few weeks I owned it, although it has gotten better. With the Gibson, it’s usually in tune when I open the case, and it never goes out. With the Epiphone, I have to make sure and tune it before I start playing, and I might need to readjust it once or twice throughout the course of a three-hour jam. (This is about on par with every sub-$400 guitar I’ve ever owned.)

Of course, the real signature of a guitar is it’s tone, so I made a short video comparing the Gibson Hummingbird to the Epiphone Hummingbird Pro. Both guitars have Elixir Custom Light strings, and the audio was recorded on a Zoom H2n set to 4 channel mode. If you’re reading/watching this on a phone or laptop, you’ll probably have to plug in some headphones to really hear the difference.

So there you have it, a detailed look at the differences between a Gibson Hummingbird and an Epiphone Hummingbird Artist.

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Review: Big Kahuna 12-volt Portable Shower

Thanks to a generous co-worker of mine we had the chance this weekend to test a Big Kahuna Portable Shower Shower.

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The system consists of the water tank (ours is 8 gallon, but they’re available in various sizes), the 12 volt plug, the hose with the shower head at the end, and a small water pump inside.  I was happy to see that both the plug, and the shower head came with very long cords because we had intended to put it down in the lazarette for after-swim shower and dog washing in the cockpit.

The pump inside is German made.

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The whole thing was very simple to put together, and even full of water was light enough for me to lift town into the lazarette. The top lid is supposed to absorb sunlight to give you warm showers, but I’m a bit skeptical of that claim.

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The pressure on it was similar to a standard shower head and about the same as what we get from the faucets on the boat. It wouldn’t do much good trying to spray mud off the anchor, but it has enough pressure to rinse soap out of your hair.

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It was also perfect for washing a certain smelly dog.

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It would definitely be more cost efficient to just connect a wash-down hose to our current water system. However, the Big Kahuna does have some advantages.

Not all boats have pressurized water systems, so it is definitely the easiest way to add a cockpit wash-down hose.

With the Big Kahuna you’re also adding additional freshwater capacity. It’s nice to know those cockpit showers aren’t cutting into the drinking water supply.

Portability is another perk. Take the Big Kahuna to the beach, and you no longer have to get back in the car with sandy feet or gear.

We’ll be testing the Big Kahuna further, but I’m definitely looking forward to rinsing the salt off next time I go swimming. Plus, no more dog hair in the boat drains.

The “Scrubba Wash Bag” Review

Last year we got the Scrubba Wash Bag from Fred’s brother for Christmas.

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It’s basically just a dry bag with bumps on one side and an air vent, but on the Scrubba website it brags that it will produce a “machine quality wash.”  We have been wanting to try it out, but until last week we’d never been on a boat long enough that we remembered to use it.

So here’s how it works:

1. Fill the bag with clothes, enough water to get them all wet, and a tiny bit of detergent. (We used fresh water for the washing, but I suppose it could be salt water.)

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2. Then you let out all the air and just swoosh it around. This can be harder than it looks, as a lot of the clothes tend to get knotted up.

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3. The bag then calls for two rinses. I think the first rinse could be salt water, and then the second rinse with fresh water, but we used fresh for both.

The Verdict

Pros

  • It did indeed wash the clothes, and several big stains came out.
  • It packs up into a tiny space. This would be a big deal if you were backpacking.
  • It can doubles as a dry bag, and you may also be able to use it in place of a bucket for some things.

Cons

  • If you’re only using fresh water, I feel like it uses just as much or more water than a sink or a bucket.
  • Even after the second rinse, the clothes were still a little soapy.
  • The actual washing is a bit awkward and difficult. It would be easier to stir and rub the clothes in a bucket than it was to try and rub them around in the bag.
  • It’s more likely to get a hole than a bucket.

In closing, If you are backpacking or camping I think this is a major advantage. It could roll up in your pack and serve several purposes. If you’re on a boat and you already have a bucket or sink with a good plug, save your cash.

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Improving the ONA Bowery camera bag

I’m always looking for the perfect camera bag. While big padded Lowepro bags and backpacks are great, they kind of scream, “HEY, I’M A TOURIST AND THIS IS MY CAMERA THAT YOU SHOULD STEAL!” For a very long time I was looking for something small and light that could still handle a camera body and one or two lenses when I’m traveling or hiking.

Then last Christmas my lovely wife bought me this beautiful ONA Bowery leather camera bag.

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In the past two years this bag has transversed the United States and crossed the Atlantic twice. However, the more I’ve carried it, the more I’ve noticed it has a few problems.

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On the inside, it has only one padded divider. That means you get one camera with a mounted lens on one side, and one lens or flash crammed into the other with a charger.

Those two small front pockets and two small side pockets can each hold one, and only one, of the following: a spare battery, a passport, a lens filter, or a USB cable.

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ONA touted this rear pocket as being for an iPad Mini or other small tablet. Well, I happened to have an iPad Mini, so I stuck it in there. However, it slid out twice in my car and once at Charles de Gaulle airport, so I decided sticking anything in the open back pocket was just asking for it to be lost or stolen.

ONA sells large padded dividers for the briefcase size bags and small padded dividers like what came with the Bowery, but for some reason they don’t sell a divider the width of the Bowery to create an internal iPad sleeve. However, my very lovely and talented wife, who was thoughtful enough to buy me the bag in the first place, can sew.

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For $15 I ordered two large padded dividers, and after about 30 minutes of work, Mary had downsized one of them to the interior size of the Bowery. (Thank you, honey!)

I now have a secure interior slot for the iPad, a notepad, or a battery charger.

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I really don’t know why ONA doesn’t sell the bags like this in the first place. The padded dividers are just cardboard wrapped in packing foam. (And they are a serious pain to cut through with old scissors!) If they can sell two for $15 at a profit, they could definitely add one to each bag without increasing production costs enough to raise the cost of the bag.

And now with the interior padded pocket for tablets, why not add a zipper to the rear outside pocket, so it’s actually usable?

Are you listening ONA?!!!

Shortly after I received this bag, ONA released the Berlin, which if I could do it all again, I’d probably choose that slightly larger model. However, being a gift from Mary, I’ll stick with the Bowery. It is a very tough bag, and it keeps me packing light when we’re doing lots of walking.