Review: Big Kahuna 12-volt Portable Shower

Thanks to a generous co-worker of mine we had the chance this weekend to test a Big Kahuna Portable Shower Shower.

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The system consists of the water tank (ours is 8 gallon, but they’re available in various sizes), the 12 volt plug, the hose with the shower head at the end, and a small water pump inside.  I was happy to see that both the plug, and the shower head came with very long cords because we had intended to put it down in the lazarette for after-swim shower and dog washing in the cockpit.

The pump inside is German made.

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The whole thing was very simple to put together, and even full of water was light enough for me to lift town into the lazarette. The top lid is supposed to absorb sunlight to give you warm showers, but I’m a bit skeptical of that claim.

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The pressure on it was similar to a standard shower head and about the same as what we get from the faucets on the boat. It wouldn’t do much good trying to spray mud off the anchor, but it has enough pressure to rinse soap out of your hair.

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It was also perfect for washing a certain smelly dog.

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It would definitely be more cost efficient to just connect a wash-down hose to our current water system. However, the Big Kahuna does have some advantages.

Not all boats have pressurized water systems, so it is definitely the easiest way to add a cockpit wash-down hose.

With the Big Kahuna you’re also adding additional freshwater capacity. It’s nice to know those cockpit showers aren’t cutting into the drinking water supply.

Portability is another perk. Take the Big Kahuna to the beach, and you no longer have to get back in the car with sandy feet or gear.

We’ll be testing the Big Kahuna further, but I’m definitely looking forward to rinsing the salt off next time I go swimming. Plus, no more dog hair in the boat drains.

The “Scrubba Wash Bag” Review

Last year we got the Scrubba Wash Bag from Fred’s brother for Christmas.

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It’s basically just a dry bag with bumps on one side and an air vent, but on the Scrubba website it brags that it will produce a “machine quality wash.”  We have been wanting to try it out, but until last week we’d never been on a boat long enough that we remembered to use it.

So here’s how it works:

1. Fill the bag with clothes, enough water to get them all wet, and a tiny bit of detergent. (We used fresh water for the washing, but I suppose it could be salt water.)

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2. Then you let out all the air and just swoosh it around. This can be harder than it looks, as a lot of the clothes tend to get knotted up.

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3. The bag then calls for two rinses. I think the first rinse could be salt water, and then the second rinse with fresh water, but we used fresh for both.

The Verdict

Pros

  • It did indeed wash the clothes, and several big stains came out.
  • It packs up into a tiny space. This would be a big deal if you were backpacking.
  • It can doubles as a dry bag, and you may also be able to use it in place of a bucket for some things.

Cons

  • If you’re only using fresh water, I feel like it uses just as much or more water than a sink or a bucket.
  • Even after the second rinse, the clothes were still a little soapy.
  • The actual washing is a bit awkward and difficult. It would be easier to stir and rub the clothes in a bucket than it was to try and rub them around in the bag.
  • It’s more likely to get a hole than a bucket.

In closing, If you are backpacking or camping I think this is a major advantage. It could roll up in your pack and serve several purposes. If you’re on a boat and you already have a bucket or sink with a good plug, save your cash.

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